Pip Biddlecombe’s “Low Blow” T-Bucket

Pip Biddlecombe Low Blow T-Bucket

A few years ago, while surfing the web, some photos of a super-low supercharged T-Bucket really caught my eye.

Pip Biddlecombe Low Blow T-Bucket

Then, I was shocked to notice the steering wheel on the right hand side and learned the bucket builder’s name was Pip Biddlecombe. Those two facts could only mean one thing: this mind-blowing bucket was British built!

Pip Biddlecombe Low Blow T-Bucket

Turns out Pip is a well-known U.K. hot rod builder who in the 70s built a rather famous Austin known as Rubellion, which was powered by a blown Daimler hemi. I believe that today Pip is into military vehicles, like tanks.

Pip Biddlecombe Low Blow T-Bucket

Pip’s radical T-Bucket was featured in “Rod Action” magazine back in 1986. Based on a 1 1/2 x 3-inch rectangular tube frame, it was only natural for Pip to employ a Jaguar independent rear suspension and a very nicely dropped 1940 Morris I-beam front axle.

Pip Biddlecombe Low Blow T-Bucket

The one-piece fiberglass top flipped up for “step-in” entry into this extremely low-profile T-Bucket.

Pip Biddlecombe Low Blow T-Bucket

You gotta’ love the simple, clean interior which featured a Pip-built chainlink steering wheel topping a short vertical column coming out of the floor. Speaking of floor, that’s where the two sparse bucket seat cushions were placed with the automatic tranny shifter mounted in between.

Pip Biddlecombe Low Blow T-Bucket Pip Biddlecombe Low Blow T-Bucket

With its extremely low profile and ground clearance, though, it was not a trailer queen and was driven to rod runs and shows around England.

Pip Biddlecombe Low Blow T-Bucket

And Pip gets huge points from me for his unique choice of motorvation (even more so in the U.K.), a 389 cubic inch 6-71 blown Pontiac fed by a pair of Holley 600 series carbs.

Pip Biddlecombe Low Blow T-Bucket Pip Biddlecombe Low Blow T-Bucket

In case you’re wondering, the windshield height was listed at a mere 9 inches which was certainly tough on headroom and creature comfort, but who can argue against that sinister low profile?

Pip Biddlecombe Low Blow T-Bucket Pip Biddlecombe Low Blow T-Bucket Pip Biddlecombe Low Blow T-Bucket Pip Biddlecombe Low Blow T-Bucket

I had always heard Pip’s T referred to as “Low Blow” and would guess that was emphasized by the tailgate question, “How low can you go?

Pip Biddlecombe Low Blow T-Bucket

I’m a huge fan of this car, despite the fact that I later learned it was likely very much inspired by another radical T-Bucket which was built a decade earlier. If you love the look of Pip’s super low T-Bucket, then you’ll want to check out our story on Scott Ellis and the original Low Blow, as well as our combo story on The Two “Low Blow” T-Buckets.
Pip Biddlecombe "Low Blow" T-Bucket

Pip Biddlecombe "Low Blow" T-Bucket
Pip Biddlecombe Low Blow T-Bucket

Pip Biddlecombe "Low Blow" T-Bucket

Pip Biddlecombe "Low Blow" T-Bucket

Pip Biddlecombe "Low Blow" T-Bucket

Pip Biddlecombe "Low Blow" T-Bucket

Pip Biddlecombe "Low Blow" T-Bucket

Pip Biddlecombe "Low Blow" T-Bucket
Pip Biddlecombe Low Blow T-Bucket

Somewhat surprisingly, a lot of great looking T-Buckets have been built in England and I’d have to say that Pip Biddlecombe’s “Low Blow” has to be one of my favorites.

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7 thoughts on “Pip Biddlecombe’s “Low Blow” T-Bucket”

  1. Love seeing how others handle the engineering challenges of building extremely low cars. Thanks for sharing this with us.

    Reply
  2. Hi,
    Does anybody know the whereabouts of a one off belch beer truck which was stolen from 59 taunton lane, old coulsdon in approx. 2009. It was being stored at this address but I have only recently found out that it is no longer there. If anyone has any information on this please call the owner of the truck, Simon James Maw, on 02087719622 asap.
    Thank you

    Reply
    • hi
      Pip is my uncle and i remeber this car being built during my childhood, contrary to the above info this car was never road legal in the uk because of the lack of mudguards and also, more importantly, it was virtually impossible to see the direction of travel past that massive pontiac engine! Pip won many awards for this car but after several years he converted it with a new chassis to a roadster so that it could be driven on the road, it lost its roof and was painted black with dark blue flames. This car also suffered from engine overheating problems that Pip never completely managed to cure. It was eventually sold and after that i have no idea what happened to it. Great to see it again on the net though, thanks

      Reply

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